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Nunatsiaq News – LETTERS: Nunavut January 14, 2016 – 8:30 am

Inuit Broadcasting Corp. thanks contributors to media arts centre

Want to donate? IBC still seeks $1.3 million in Revenue Canada eligible contributions

NUNATSIAQ NEWS

IBC’s new media arts centre on Federal Rd. in Iqaluit. (FILE PHOTO)

The Inuit Broadcasting Corp. held a grand opening for the Nunavut Media Arts Centre on Dec. 2, 2015. It was a wonderful success!

We would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the following contributions that have assisted us to get to this important milestone. A full list, which includes many generous individuals and companies, is available at here.

Guardian of Inuit Culture ($1 million+):

  • Government of Nunavut — ᓄᓇᕗᑦ ᒐᕙᒪᖓ — Gouvernement du Nunavut
    • Government of Canada — ᑲᓇᑕ ᒐᕙᒪᖓ — Gouvernement du Canada

IQ/Traditional Knowledge Champion ($100,000-$499,999):

  • Kitikmeot Inuit Association — ᕿᑎᕐᒥᐅᑦ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᑲᑐᔾᔨᖃᑎᒌᖓᑦ
    • Kivalliq Inuit Association — ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥᑦ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᑲᑐᔾᔨᖃᑎᒌᖓᑦ
    • Qikiqtani Inuit Association — ᕿᑭᖅᑕᓂ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᑲᑐᔾᔨᖃᑎᒌᖓᑦ

History Keeper ($50,000-$99,999):

  • Pairijait Tigumivik Society — ᐸᐃᕆᔭᐃᑦ ᑎᒍᒥᕕᒃ
    • Kakivak Association — ᑲᑭᕙᒃ ᑲᑐᔾᔨᖃ ᑎᒌᖏᑦ
    • Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. — ᓄᓇᕗᑦ ᑐᓐᖓᕕᒃᑯᑦ ᑎᒥᖓᑦ
    • NMAC Builder ($10,000-$49,000):
    • R L Hanson Construction Ltd. — ᕼᐊᓐᓴᓐ ᓴᓇᔨᖏᑦ
    • Nunavut Film Development Corporation — ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᑕᑯᓐᓇᕋᔅᓴᓕᐅᖅᑏᑦ ᑎᒥᖓᑦ

Undisclosed amount: Telesat — ᑐᓴᕈᑎᓕᕆᔨᑦ

Investors:

  • Qikiqtaaluk Corp. — ᕿᑭᕐᑖᓗᒃ ᑯᐊᐳᕇᓴᓐ
    • NCC Properties Ltd. — ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐃᓪᓗᓕᕆᔨᒃᑯᑦ
    • Atuqtuarvik Corp. – ᐊᑐᕐᑐᐊᕐᕕᒃ ᑯᐊᐳᕇᓴᓐ

Financing: First Nations Bank of Canada — ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐊᓪᓚᐃᑦ ᑮᓇᐅᔭᒃᑯᕕᖏᑦ

On behalf of the IBC board and staff, I invite you to contribute to this success story and help diminish the remaining amount of $1.3 million — of the $8.6 million goal — for new media equipment and training, and related costs.

Tax receipts are available and donation information is available at http://www.building4dreams.ca.

Qujannamiimarialuk!

Madeleine d’Argencourt
IBC Chair

CBC News Posted: Dec 03, 2015 9:55 AM CT Last Updated: Dec 03, 2015 10:42 AM CT

Inuit Broadcasting Corp. opens new media centre in Iqaluit:

IBC unveils new state-of-the-art media centre in Nunavut’s capital

By John Van Dusen,  Full article

Nunatsiaq NEWS: Nunavut December 04, 2015 – 4:00 pm

Inuit broadcast centre reclaims the past, steps into the future: “It’s about time that IBC has its own building”
STEVE DUCHARME

IBC archivist Loretta Kanatsiak surrounded by boxes full of old analog video recordings that she will digitize one tape at a time. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
IBC archivist Loretta Kanatsiak surrounded by boxes full of old analog video recordings
that she will digitize one tape at a time. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)

 

IBC's new media arts centre, located off the Federal Rd. in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
IBC’s new media arts centre, located off the Federal Rd. in Iqaluit.
(PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)

 

Johnny the Travelling Lemming, whose head is just poking above the table, talks to reporters Dec. 4 at the opening of IBC's media arts centre in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)

Johnny the Travelling Lemming, whose head is just poking above the table, talks to reporters Dec. 4 at the opening of IBC’s media arts centre in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
For the Inuit Broadcasting Corp., its newly completed Nunavut Media Arts Centre is a step into the future — and a reclamation of the past.That much was apparent at a Dec. 2 open house at the IBC’s new $8.6 million building tucked away on Federal Rd. near Iqaluit’s downtown core.“It’s about time that IBC has its own building and it is something that will benefit not just IBC itself but Nunavummiut, because we can now say we own our own media in Nunavut,” said Paul Quassa, Nunavut’s education minister.Quassa frequently hosted and produced IBC programs in the 1980s and 1990s.“We used to do live programming, and now they have their own centre that should become more accessible. IBC was originally made to ensure our language survived and I certainly think this will enhance that,” Quassa said.“As I recalled working for IBC as a director before becoming MLA, it was very rewarding to be part of the corporation,” said Monica Ell-Kanayuk, the minister of economic development, after a ribbon-cutting ceremony.The new building is equipped with state-of-the-art video and audio editing suites, a new sound stage, and a digital server farm that will store decades of IBC programming. And the process of transferring and archiving all that historic footage may be what defines the first few years of IBC’s occupation of their new building. That’s because hidden away in the attic-like top floor are rows and rows of boxes storing IBC’s videotape legacy.

“There are thousands and thousands of tapes up here,” IBC production manager Catherine Carry said.

“A lot of those video tapes were done in the early seventies on pneumatic tapes. They’re already deteriorating. We’re losing about five per cent [on every tape].”

The IBC began the process of digitizing their tapes a few years ago and have digitized about 2,500 video files so far, Carry said. It costs about $54 dollars to properly digitize and archive one tape. Some of that work is being done in Ottawa. As for the tapes that remain in Nunavut, the task of transferring these will fall on archivist Loretta Kanatsiak. Old tape formats, such as Betamax or 3/4-inch cassettes, will first have to be transferred into the more modern DV format. That process — the most time-consuming — is a lot like making a copy of an audiocassette on an old stereo. The DV format can then be transferred onto a computer hard drive. Kanatsiak estimates it will take years to get through all the tapes.

“I’m putting in two days to concentrate on digitizing and on the other days I’ll be working on something else,” she said.

A digitization program will eventually be created to help Kanatsiak with the process. Though donations from private businesses as well as organizations such as Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, construction of the Nunavut Media Arts Centre was completed on budget.

“We were lucky. Once we started building, there certainly were challenges,” said the vice president of IBC, Debbie Brisebois.

“We had some issues with materials. That got sorted out, we got caught up, and it ended up on time and on budget, which is amazing,” Brisebois said.

NEWS: Nunavut January 20, 2015 – 2:45 pm

Ottawa kicks in money for Inuit broadcasting archive

IBC’s archive to be located in new media arts centre in Iqaluit

NUNATSIAQ NEWS

Read article>>

IBC to get new home

$5.1-million facility expected to be completed by 2015

Cody Punter Northern News Services

Published Monday, September 30, 2013 NUNAVUT

Nunavut’s television and film industry got a huge boost on September 25, as the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation (IBC) announced that it will be building the Nunavut Media Arts Centre (NMAC) in Iqaluit. “This has really been a long time coming,”said Debbie Brisebois, executive director at IBC. “Hopefully it opens a lot of opportunities for a lot of people.”

The NMAC will be Nunavut’s first full-scale, state-of-the-art, digital audio, video, recording, performance and post-production facility. The IBC currently has a studio, but it is housed in an old government building, which was not intended to be used as a studio. “It’ll be a facility that will be more conducive for more production,” said Brisebois of the new centre.

According to Brisebois, IBC has been expanding in recent years. It has even started producing original shows, including the popular ‘Qanurli?’. Qanurli?’s producer Stacey MacDonald said the upgrades are very much needed. “We’re already spilling out of our office. We don’t have a lot of space,” said MacDonald. On top of the lack of space, MacDonald said the current studio has poor sound quality. “If you listen closely to our show, you can probably hear a low-pitched hum,” said MacDonald.

The centre will also house the Inuit Film and Video Archive. Brisebois said the IBC currently has over thirty years worth of archived footage that need a home. “Really at this point, they’re not stored properly, and worst of all, they’re not accessible to the public,” said Brisebois.

By providing a digital, high definition studio with editing capabilities, Brisebois hopes the new centre will offer a forum for new talent to thrive, from local and territorial freelancers, to medium-sized production companies and international broadcasters. “Hopefully this will provide the opportunity to expand,” said Brisebois.

Three Inuit-owned firms – Qikiqtaaluk Corporation, NCC Properties Limited and Atuqtuarvik Corporation – will partner with IBC in the construction and financing of the project. Together, the three firms and IBC have formed a new company, Sanavallianiq Limited, with the specific intention of completing construction of the NMAC.

Construction is expected to begin next summer and it is hoped the Arts Centre will be complete in early 2015. The cost of the new building, $5.2 million, will be funded and administered by Sanavallianiq Ltd. The foundations for the building were installed several years ago and will be re-used for construction of the new centre.

Brisebois said IBC is still working on obtaining financial support for $3.1 million for the furniture, modern media equipment and other related costs. She said IBC is continuing to apply to territorial and federal programs. It is also actively seeking the establishment of public and other private partnerships. “I feel quite optimistic now that we’ve entered into a partnership,” said Brisebois. “That’s our next big step.”

NUNATSIAQ NEWS: Nunavut – September 26, 2013 – 1:43 pm:

IBC teams up with Inuit orgs for media arts centre construction

Sanavallianiq Ltd. will administer the building’s $5.2 million construction

Estimated to cost $8 to $10 million, the new media arts centre, spearheaded by the Inuit Broadcasting Corp., would provide Nunavut’s first full-scale, state-of-the-art, digital recording and production facilities. (FILE PHOTO)
Estimated to cost $8 to $10 million, the new media arts centre, spearheaded by the Inuit Broadcasting Corp., would provide Nunavut’s first full-scale, state-of-the-art, digital recording and production facilities. (FILE PHOTO)

Read more>>

June 12, 2013 – Nunatsiaq News – NEWS:

Telesat to donate money to IBC’s future Nunavut media centre

“It’s fitting they have given us this boost of encouragement and we are very grateful”

Telesat Canada, the satellite communications company, will make a donation to the Inuit Broadcasting Corp.‘s Nunavut Media Arts Centre fundraising campaign, an IBC news release said July 12.

Read full article

May/June 2013 issue – Above & Beyond Magazine:

Johnny Needs A New Home by Ann Meekitjuk Hanson

It stood there, alone, high on top of a three-legged pole in the middle of the room. We, the community workers, volunteers and social workers were invited for the unveiling of this object. People sat in chairs or stood against the wall in anticipation, not saying a word. We just stared at it. We were told it was a video camera. This was in the winter 1970.

Full article with Inuktitut and photos.

“Johnny Needs A New Home” © courtesy of Above & Beyond/Canada’s Arctic Journal May/June 2013  www.arcticjournal.ca    issuu.com/Arctic_Journal

Older

April 24, 2013 – Nunatsiaq News – COMMENTARY: Nunavut

Nunavut media arts centre would usher in “new era”

“NMAC represents grand opportunities to produce leading-edge digital content”

SPECIAL TO NUNATSIAQ NEWS

MADELEINE D’ARGENCOURT Chair, Inuit Broadcasting Corp.

Significant changes in the worldwide broadcast and communications industries are underway because of advances in digital technology and the pervasiveness of internet connectivity. IT-based digital delivery systems are rapidly replacing analogue broadcast systems. Standard-definition television has virtually been replaced by high-definition, or HD. Increasing numbers of specialty channels commission productions from a growing pool of independent producers; the expectation is to do more for less. The production of content intended only for the internet is becoming more and more viable. Far beyond a technological shift, the change is at the very core of the industry.

Read more>>

Feb. 28, 2013 – E-mail Newsletter insert in From All Directions – Indigenous and Regional Cultures and World Markets News from Bronitsky and Associates Bringing Together Indigenous Peoples and the World Since 1992

Nunavut Seeking Assistance for Improved Arts and Communication

Over the course of 2012, planning has progressed for a media arts centre in Iqaluit. Under the umbrella of the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation, the prime purpose of the Nunavut Media Arts Centre will be to help advance Inuit language media production. The campaign, Sanavallianiq Isumagijaujunut – Building for Dreams, was launched this past September and aims to raise funds and in-kind donations to complete the construction of the nearly nine million dollar facility.

January 15, 2013 Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and NationTalk posting:

Support the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation

Check out the Nunavut Media Arts Centre (NMAC) fundraising site to find out how to show your support. Learn about the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation’s plans to bring its programming up to today’s HD and digital standards in the new building and properly safeguard 40 years of Inuit film and video for public access. View your favourite lemming in this NMAC promo “Johnny needs a new home!” along with clips of IBC’s programs, past and present, available through the main page.

November 2012 on-line newsletter insert – Adventure Canada:

Nunavut Media Arts Centre: Sanavallianiq Isumagijaujunut – Building for Dreams

Many travellers over the course of 2012 learned about plans for a media arts centre in Iqaluit. Under the umbrella of the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation, the prime purpose of the centre will be to help advance Inuit language media production broadcasting in Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun. The campaign, Sanavallianiq Isumagijaujunut – Building for Dreams, was launched this past September and aims to raise funds and in-kind donations to complete the construction of the nearly nine million dollar media arts center.

For more information on the project and how you can help please visit: www.Building4Dreams.ca

Nunatsiaq On-line – Sept. 21, 2012: Debbie Brisebois, executive director of the Inuit Broadcasting Corp., Qikiqtani Inuit Association president Okalik Eegeesiak, Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq, Madeleine d’Argencourt, the chairperson of IBC’s board, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. president Cathy Towtongie, Nunavut Commissioner Edna Elias and Elisapee Sheutiapik, the president of Pauktuutit national Inuit women’s association, stand together following the announcement of the IBC’s new fundraising campaign “Sanavallianiq Isumagijaujunut – Building for Dreams.” The campaign wants to raise $8.8 million for the future Nunavut Media Arts Centre. “The concrete pad lies ready and waiting for the building in Iqaluit,” said d’Argencourt. “The up-to-date facility with modern equipment will enable IBC to continue to build on its impressive 30 year legacy of Inuit language programming.” (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)

Naniiliqpita NTI Newsletter brief – Fall 2012 – see p. 31

Nunavut Media Arts Centre Sanavallianiq Isumagijaujunut – Building for Dreams By Catherine Carry

In Sept., 2012, the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation (IBC) launched Sanavallianiq Isumagijaujunut – Building for Dreams, a fundraising campaign to complete construction of the Nunavut Media Arts Centre (NMAC) in Iqaluit. IBC will use the centre to continue its work with a wide range of award-winning, Inuit language video productions and training programs. With an estimated cost of $7 million, including equipment and associated training, IBC and partners are creating a landmark for Iqaluit, a showpiece for Nunavut and a milestone in Inuit cultural history. The proposed 8000 square foot building will incorporate:

  • The first full scale, state of the art digital facility for audio/video recording, performance and post production in Nunavut.
  • Studio production suitable for live programming, including performance space and capacity for live studio audiences.
  • Office and post-production space for Inuit Communications Society Ltd.
  • The Inuit Film and Video Archive which preserves the priceless collection of historic film and video shot by Inuit since the 1970s.

www.inuitbroadcasting.ca

NUNATSIAQ NEWS: Around the Arctic November 17, 2011

Kivalliq Inuit Assoc. gives $200,000 to Nunavut media arts centre project

… The Inuit Broadcasting Corp. is one step closer to realizing its media arts centre, thanks to a $200,000 donation from the Kivalliq Inuit Association.

The KIA joins the territory’s two other Inuit organizations, the Kitikmeot Inuit Association and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, in supporting the construction of the Nunavut Media Arts Centre, set to open in Iqaluit in 2013. …

NUNATSIAQ NEWS: Nunavut September 26, 2011

“Our kids grew up watching Takuginai”

Nunavut’s new media arts centre has received more community support: Iqaluit’s R.L. Hanson Construction Ltd. has offered to haul freight for the Inuit Broadcasting Corp.’s project.

R.L. Hanson Construction Ltd., an Inuit-owned and Iqaluit-based company, will haul freight from the sealift dock to IBC’s Federal Road building site at no cost, the IBC announced in a Sept. 26 news release. “We believe in the project and we’re ready to contribute,” said the company’s president Bob Hanson. “Our kids grew up watching Takuginai. Inuit broadcasting is part of our family, and it’s part of our culture.” …

NUNATSIAQ NEWS: Nunavut May 27, 2011

KIA helps IBC media arts centre project

The Kitikmeot Inuit Assoc. gives $200,000 to the Inuit Broadcasting Corp.’s project

Kitikmeot Inuit Association president Charlie Evalik presents a $200,000 cheque to Madeleine d’Argencourt, president of the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation — money that will go towards the Inuktitut broadcaster’s new media arts centre in Iqaluit. (PHOTO COURTESY OF IBC)
Kitikmeot Inuit Association president Charlie Evalik presents a $200,000 cheque to Madeleine d’Argencourt, president of the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation — money that will go towards the Inuktitut broadcaster’s new media arts centre in Iqaluit. (PHOTO COURTESY OF IBC)

The Inuit Broadcasting Corporation has netted more financial support for its new media arts centre project, with a cheque for $200,000 from the Kitikmeot Inuit Association this past week. …

NUNATSIAQ NEWS: Iqaluit – May 09, 2012

$10-million Nunavut media arts gets project management money from feds

$164,000 goes to the Inuit Broadcasting Corp. over the next two years

The Nunavut Media Arts Centre got a boost today with the announcement that it will be getting some money from Ottawa. A May 9 federal government news release did not put any figure to the money slated for project, but a spokesperson from Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq’s office confirmed that the Inuit Broadcasting Corp. will receive $164,000 over two years towards the management of its new centre.
NUNATSIAQ NEWS: Iqaluit April 28, 2011
“We need a real Nunavut Media Arts Centre”
The future Nunavut Media Arts Centre has new supporter: Ann Meekitjuk Hanson, a broadcaster and former Commissioner of Nunavut, who has joined the planning team for the $10-million centre in Iqaluit. … The proposed 8,000-square-foot building will be a state-of-the-art digital facility for audio, video, recording, performance and post-production. The centre will also house an Inuit Film and Video Archive, a facility where old tapes from IBC can be preserved, catalogued, digitized and stored safely. …